Hahnemann

Are the obstacles to certainty and simplicity in practical medicine insurmountable?

Are the obstacles to certainty and simplicity in practical medicine insurmountable? 1 Dr. Herz’s essay “On the Medicinal uses of the Phellandrium aquaticum,” andc., in the first part of the second volume of the Journal der practischen Arzneykunde, plunged me into a sort of melancholy, which only by dint of long continued reflection has given …

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The friend of health (Hahnemann, 1791) – Part i – Protection against infection in epidemic diseases

For every kind of poisonous exhalation there is in all probability a particular antidote, only we do not always know enough about the latter. It is well known that the air of our atmosphere contains two-thirds of a gas that is immediately fatal to man and beast, and extinguishes flame. Mixed up along with it …

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The mode of propagation of the asiatic cholera – Hahnemann, 1831

Two opinions, exactly opposed to each other prevail on this subject. One party considers the pestilence as only epidemic, of atmospheric-telluric nature, just as though it were merely spread through the air, from which there would in that case be no protection. The other party denies this, and holds it to be communicable by contagion …

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Observations on the scarlet-fever (Hahnemann, 1808)

The malignant scarlet-fever that has prevailed in Germany for eight years and proved fatal to many thousands of children and older persons, often so unexpectedly, so rapidly, and with symptoms never before heard of under such circumstances, this murderous disease, termed scarlet-fever by almost every one, is really anything but scarlet-fever; it is a new …

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The Medical Observer

The Medical Observer Samuel Hahnemann from the introduction to Materia Medica Pura In order to be able to observe well, the medicinal practitioner requires to possess, what is not to be met with among ordinary physicians even in a moderate degree, the capacity and habit of noticing carefully and correctly the phenomena that take place in …

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